The Urban-Rural Divide In Canada Is Strengthening – And Will Become Even More Distinctive Over Time

Economic reports regularly cite countries’ “visible urbanisation,” a fancy word for those people who spend more time in cities than in rural areas or other areas of the country. That’s an unfair metric by…

The Urban-Rural Divide In Canada Is Strengthening - And Will Become Even More Distinctive Over Time

Economic reports regularly cite countries’ “visible urbanisation,” a fancy word for those people who spend more time in cities than in rural areas or other areas of the country. That’s an unfair metric by many peoples’ standards, since rural areas often lack services and are completely at the mercy of the region’s weather. However, the changing nature of work has forced a paradigm shift in the economy — and it is turning the suburbs into a place where people spend more time in urban spaces.

In its sixth annual survey of “nomad lifestyles”, Expatistan noted in its February edition that the trend is accelerating. After all, people pay more attention to the area they live in than the population the locals represent.

“Corruption, mismanagement, and uncertainty are leaving urban areas behind,” the study commented. “As the urban life comes to surround you, the effort starts to pay off. Instead of always putting oneself in the background of ‘city life’, work becomes a joy, and other things are forgotten – in the most bitter sense of the word.”

Researchers surveyed over 5,000 expats, all of whom submitted one photo of themselves at home and one photo at home in their living space. They then statistically sized those by area, finding the trend lines were currently skewed in the direction of the Atlantic provinces.

Here’s what they found in terms of the biggest differences in life styles between rural and urban areas.

Prosperity

Despite the growth of the metropolitan, 63% of expats surveyed said they were having more economic opportunities and freedom than they were at home. And another 60% cited a greater chance of financial security, which explains why more are willing to leave their significant others behind.

Health

The most notable observation from this survey relates to people living with the passage of time and the prevalence of yoga and meditation. Not surprising given the widely reported effects of exposure to other cultures and knowing how to make the most of your surroundings.

Socially

Socially, expats in Canada felt more accepted by their residents than expats in the U.S. Part of this may be due to their sheer size. The market share of people like Canadians, Americans, Europeans, and Russians is much larger across Canada’s 10 regions, therefore spreading the flotsam and jetsam across more than 2,500 cities, towns, and villages.

Independence

Expats cited less rules and regulations as the key reason they have more freedom. They were additionally more likely to own their own homes, cars, and other assets.

Worldwide brands

Dinez believes that globally known brands are attractive not only to employees and leaders, but also to the expats in question. That means that factors like accessibility and costs for food, apparel, and entertainment/entertainment are all considered when it comes to staying at home or joining a lifestyle abroad.

How does Canada appear higher in the expat standings compared to the U.S.? According to Expatistan, it could be due to the concentration of companies within Canada’s boundaries. It seems more likely that expats are leaving domestic employers for expat employers who offer more flexibility.

Overall, Expatistan found that “even the same lives in a different city or country can be different.” Some key life changes reflect a “lifestyle fallacy” within expat communities. When choosing a local location, work habits, perceived social norms, and personal freedom are significant.

At the same time, expats find that quality of life remains their biggest determining factor in where they live. “Luxury is relative and little is carried over from one territory to another,” Expatistan revealed.

In other words, the harsh realities of domestic life aren’t always what people expect from their expat hometowns.

While there are certainly strong economic and social implications surrounding the emergence of remote work, there are also more humanitarian factors. In the Canadian context, efforts to relieve rural suffering following the Global Financial Crisis resulted in “poverty rates that are 11 times higher than the national average.”

Ultimately, Expatistan suggests that we are learning as to the different kinds of small-scale globalization that has taken over, including how to strike a proper balance between connecting and connecting again.

Just as the interstices of large civilizations are shifting to reach different levels of connectivity, our demographics are also in flux. Our lifestyles will in turn change as a result of the decade of economic chaos that China is now in, which could ultimately be a positive thing. As long as people don’t find jobs only in that region and grow bored or unhappy over time, why does a remote lifestyle have to signify an absence of life?

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