Journalists: ‘We believe it’s time’ to give journalists the right to unionize

by Declan Kenny FORD revealed on Tuesday that it spent $18.7 million in the final quarter of 2017 (that’s an average of over $1100 per employee) on wages and benefits. Over 100,000 workers (99.4%)…

Journalists: 'We believe it's time' to give journalists the right to unionize

by Declan Kenny

FORD revealed on Tuesday that it spent $18.7 million in the final quarter of 2017 (that’s an average of over $1100 per employee) on wages and benefits. Over 100,000 workers (99.4%) are all earning a living wage.

Below is an excerpt from the Fair Work Sticking Point bill on #NursesFairWage http://t.co/WB32pJ5o4w pic.twitter.com/V7lkc7vRLQ — Ford Elections (@FordElections) May 4, 2015

Nevertheless, the nurses are angry that new legislation being pushed by the bosses will effectively freeze their wages, and not tell them when they would get back their original amounts.

The bill has been branded “a slap in the face” by a nursing leader from Dalton McGuinty’s 2009 government.

Under current legislation, a group of public sector workers are paid a flat level amount each month, based on their years of service.

The Fair Work Sticking Point bill proposes that “for workers with less than a 10 year average and more than 25 years of service, a one time lump sum payment in lieu of their base pay is payable”.

“It doesn’t seem fair, it’s not right, it puts nurses out on the street, it doesn’t guarantee that nurses get a livable wage,” said Patrice Kinikini, NDP MPP and nurse for 24 years.

Labour leader Yasir Naqvi promised his party would support the minimum wage hikes but said they “need a better guarantee” about future raises.

MPP Lina Boivin and NDP leader Andrea Horwath also wanted to see a commitment to a living wage during budget talks.

PC Leader Doug Ford (Kimmel Patch) broke away from the coalition to address the nurses, and his words were not kind.

“If you have unionized nurses, you have 35,000 people being screwed by union rules,” he said.

He accused nurses of being lazy, and named a nurses’ contract negotiation that took four years to come to a conclusion, as one example.

Nurses argue that they must take an extra month-end holiday each year because of regulations that prevent them from sharing in the extra bonus in the summer.

They say it’s unfair for them to have to take even more paid vacations to make up for the extra vacation time they are not getting.

Leave a Comment