Joe Biden: Will 2020 run be comeback bid?

Image copyright Getty Images Image caption ‘This is not a Republican and Democrat agenda,’ he says. Former Vice President Joe Biden intends to “turn the page” on his failed presidential campaign and seek the…

Joe Biden: Will 2020 run be comeback bid?

Image copyright Getty Images Image caption ‘This is not a Republican and Democrat agenda,’ he says.

Former Vice President Joe Biden intends to “turn the page” on his failed presidential campaign and seek the office once again in 2020.

It would mark the Democrat’s second White House bid and comes as President Donald Trump has struggled to assert control over the Republican party.

Mr Biden acknowledged to The New York Times that he had a steep learning curve ahead of him as a presidential candidate.

His remarks reflect his ambitions to focus more on domestic policy rather than foreign affairs, the newspaper reports.

They also emphasise that he hopes to turn his favourability with Democrats, currently around 50%, around 60% during his second run, in part to make the argument that he is better positioned to deal with immigration and citizenship concerns.

Image copyright Reuters Image caption The former vice president says the administration could benefit from people who have been let down by past Democratic policies

The former vice president, 72, is currently in Vienna to open a United States pavilion at the 2018 World Architecture Festival.

Mr Biden – an eight-term senator who also served as Delaware’s attorney general – went on to serve as vice president under Barack Obama from 2009 to early 2017.

But his eight years as head of the Democratic Party and his fame earned him the sort of scepticism within the party that his fellow politicians might find difficult to overcome.

“This is not a Republican and Democrat agenda,” Mr Biden said.

“This is the future of our country.”

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How he would shape an infrastructure bill

Image copyright Reuters Image caption Critics have accused the Obama administration of not being aggressive enough on infrastructure projects

Mr Biden campaigned heavily on the idea of a more inclusive and equitable future during his 2008 run for the White House against Mr Trump’s opponent, former Alaska governor Sarah Palin.

But his candidacy stumbled when the former Delaware senator, known for his distinctive passing comment on the latest legal developments, accidentally referred to Osama bin Laden as a “mosque-building terrorist”.

“He mentioned a ‘mosque-building terrorist’,” Mr Biden told a crowd in Dayton, Ohio on Saturday.

“Now, I thought this was the end of the interview. I turned to the cameraman and asked, ‘What did he say?'”

Mr Biden went on to apologise to his audience for the awkward gaffe, which he thought had been captured on camera only to find out it had not.

“I’m embarrassed for the fact that I didn’t respect you as I should have. Maybe that’s what this is all about,” he said at the start of the mistake-ridden event.

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He eventually finished in third place in the race, behind Mr Trump and Mr Palin.

In the months since his tenure as vice president ended, the state of Mr Biden’s health has been speculated on widely. He announced that he had been diagnosed with advanced-stage prostate cancer.

Biden responds to personal attacks

Mr Biden responded to personal attacks on social media during his first presidential run by quickly putting out an online defence of himself in which he insulted the public relations departments of Trump supporters.

At the second Democratic debate in January 2016, he did not hesitate to remind his rivals about past gaffes.

Image copyright Reuters Image caption Mr Biden said more than a few times during his failed 2016 campaign that he felt that Mr Trump lacked the temperament to be president

But those wounds may not have healed entirely.

At the debate on 24 October, Mr Biden, as his aides had been hoping, remained conspicuously silent about a potential bid.

On the other hand, Mr Trump and his aides have done little to hide their disdain for the former vice president.

“He had a tremendous, tremendous last three years,” Mr Trump told a Republican fundraiser at an event in New York on 25 November.

“Look, I mean, he’s a very bitter man,” he continued. “Now, people who have been very bitter, you know what they’re like? I call them the Billy Bush people. They’re Billy Bush people.”

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