Incredible footballer Tony Adomah highlights African power in the world game

Goalkeeper Tony Adomah is one of only four individuals to have scored for, played for and captained all three of England’s oldest professional clubs. Goalkeeper Tony Adomah’s third honour as English goalkeeper also came…

Incredible footballer Tony Adomah highlights African power in the world game

Goalkeeper Tony Adomah is one of only four individuals to have scored for, played for and captained all three of England’s oldest professional clubs.

Goalkeeper Tony Adomah’s third honour as English goalkeeper also came in Premier League action, with Charlton’s a record of 285 appearances, the second highest of all time in the club’s history, behind a legendary number one (reigned over from 1896 until 1953) of his own generation named Bert Trautmann.

However, it was Adomah’s international career for England that inspired me. At the time, during the age of 17, he was still a player of Charlton Athletic of the Second Division, and although his career took him to Swindon Town and then in his native Ghana to Accra to the club that would become his professional home, his first Premier League goal for Everton against Manchester United on August 18, 2008 was so momentous that at his home village of Kutam, according to BBC reports, a local wedding took place which featured his colleagues hoisting the famous logo of the Toffees across the dance floor and call for him to be crowned Mr Congo 2017, given his recent honour.

Not just an exceptional player, but also a dedicated philanthropist, he also created a youth centre in Accra called The Youth Football Academy which was nominated in 2009 as a European Union Rural Development Grant, and hosts hundreds of children, especially those who have less money to play and train.

Remarkable man, with some competition on the Premier League transfer front.

In a very real sense, he created a sort of corner stone for the way that Africa could be liberated from poverty, which history has shown to be largely a case of absentee colonial rulers and investors who have mostly ignored Africa’s natural resources.

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