Edmund Chidemena: Listening to Ghanaan lawyers

Edmund Chidemena, 25, of Ghana. On Christmas Eve, his 25th birthday, Edmund Chidemena, a lawyer from Ghana, boarded a flight from his home city of London to begin a three-month-long stay in his ancestral…

Edmund Chidemena: Listening to Ghanaan lawyers

Edmund Chidemena, 25, of Ghana.

On Christmas Eve, his 25th birthday, Edmund Chidemena, a lawyer from Ghana, boarded a flight from his home city of London to begin a three-month-long stay in his ancestral homeland.

Edmund plans to apply for a UN contract to volunteer as an interpreter in Ghanaian prisons.

Edmund will act as an interpreter to those accused of murder, rape, abduction and illegal incursion – meaning that while he is helping to secure the defendants’ rights, he will also be helping to secure their legal defence.

He will become the first African in 25 years to serve in such a role, providing free pro bono services.

BBC Sport: Why is your life in London not working out for you?

Edmund: I am supposed to be graduating from law school next spring, so this gives me a chance to relaunch myself. I have been struggling here.

I’ve got my MPS (master’s degree in communication law from Stirling University). A lot of the basics have been going wrong, so this is a way of recognising myself and saying: “You can do it. I can help you.”

BBC Sport: Do you see this work as a further catalyst to your job?

Edmund: I have always wanted to do something different and travel. I wanted to work in Africa to help people. It really gives me a sense of relief.

I am excited and I really love the work. I’ve met some amazing people here and found myself looking at places of interest in the village and beyond.

Edmund would like to be a legal worker in Africa

BBC Sport: Would you like to go further?

Edmund: Yes, in the future I would like to be a legal worker here. Then when I get a more decent job.

BBC Sport: Will you be leaving the UK behind?

Edmund: It’s about me following my dream. Ghana is a beautiful country. If I go to another country, I will think: “Why should I be in a country that is really far away from my family and my people?”

BBC Sport: Do you speak the language?

Edmund: It is still quite difficult for me to speak and understand the language. I have a good team to help me out. I have fantastic translators who can assist me.

BBC Sport: Would your family and friends be aware?

Edmund: I have told my family, but I haven’t told them where I am going. I am very sure they will be proud of me, but I am not telling them where I am going at the moment.

I have been told: “Be positive, the best things in life come after your death. It is wonderful that I am at the time I am choosing to do this.”

I thought: “Wow, there is more and more pressure on me”. It’s time to act, to make a change in my life. I’m trying my best to leave it behind.

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